Daisy Makes It Difficult To Keep Her Alive 

Puppies eat anything is certainly an understatement when it comes to Daisy. Unless she’s kept in her crate 24/7, she going to get into something she shouldn’t. At 11 months she still has to be watched like a hawk and we do. If you take your eye off of her for a nanosecond she’s into something. Her favorite things to eat are anything she’s not supposed to have or things that can kill her.

May 1st (2017): shortly after lunch we were getting ready to go to the barn. My husband thought he should take an allergy med before we left. He was sitting at the kitchen table and opened an Allegra D. It hit the table and bounced on the floor. He dove on the tablet, I dove at Daisy. We weren’t quick enough. She grabbed the pill and made her escape. It only took a few minutes to get her and take what was left of the pill out of her mouth. Calls to the vet, calls to the Pet Poison Hotline, induced vomiting and several hours of waiting/monitoring to see if there was a reaction. She would have been fine with a regular Allegra, but the Sudifed is harmful to dogs. Around dinner the uncontrollable sniffing and tracking arrived, along with dilated eyes. An hour truck ride to the emergency animal hospital led to an overnight stay. She was given a sedative and her vitals were monitored over night. We picked her up the following afternoon. She wasn’t 100%, but she was going to be fine.

Two weeks later Greg brought a guitar downstairs and put it on the sofa. No sooner did he turn his back when she stole a nylon guitar pick out from under the scratch guard. We have no idea how she got hold of it. He has a hard time getting it out. Just that fast, she swallowed. She was smart enough not to touch the hydrogen peroxide-peanutbutter mixture so we took her for a truck ride.  Like clockwork, 20 minutes in the truck and up things came. Everything except the pick. Since dogs can only regurgitate about 70% of their stomach contents we thought another 20 minutes may produce the guitar pick. More came up and still no pick. So we wait to see if it comes out the other end. After 4 days of watching her outside and looking for a pick I decided it was time to take her to the vet for X-rays to see exactly what was going on. No signs of the pick or any type of upcoming blockage was the good news. Another vet bill wasn’t. Still no signs of a pick, but no problems either.

A week or so later we were both in the kitchen. Daisy put her front paws on the refrigerator. Instead of getting down like she was told, she slid the calendar down the refrigerator door so it was low enough for her to steal a 1″ square magnet that was holding the calendar. Fortunately we got it back.

Since August 2016 our house has been continuously redecorated. If it’s within puppy reach, it leaves. The coffee table has nothing on it, the bottom 2 shelves of the book cases are bare, now the bottom of the refrigerator. As she grows, stuff goes. She eats books, magazines, furniture, curtain tiebacks, curtains, mini blinds, rugs, linoleum, rugs, baseboard, tags off of furniture, grass, mulch, rocks, weeds.  Is it ever going to end?

Daisy is making it very difficult to keep her alive until she’s old enough to outgrow this.

IMG_0924

Goodbye Farm

The farm was owned by an older couple. They bought it when they were first married and work it all of their lives. When they retired from farming, they built a house up the street on a different part of the farm. The rented out the original house. The land was farmed by someone else. He was very nice, she was a witch. We didn’t know what she was like until after we moved in and the guys next door told us.

It was summer and our neighbors had picnics. They always had friends over. We put signs at the barn to try to keep people away. Apparently they couldn’t read. We constantly found people messing with our horses. We talked to our neighbors about it, but that didn’t work and better than the signs. Having the horses with us was getting to be a problem.

We were there about 7 or 8 months. The owner had been coming down more and more to do things. His visits were during the day when everybody was at work. This would have been fine, but he found reasons to knock on the door and talk. I had work to do and really couldn’t deal with the interruptions. The more he came down, the bitchier she got. Then she started knocking at the door to yell at me. To this day I have no idea what she was yelling about. It was getting to be too much. We could see where this was probably going and we decided to move the horses to a near by boarding stable.

The horses were moved to their new home. It was a relief not to have to worry about people being around them. The fence came down and was stored in the barn with the rest of our horse things. We were still paying the extra for the barn so there was no hurry to get our belongings out. One night we came home from dinner out. I don’t remember why we went to the barn. We found the doors screwed shut and a no trespassing sign on the door. We weren’t sure what was going on. We didn’t do anything wrong. Nobody said a word to us. The following day we removed everything from the barn.

It was time to start looking for a new place to live. Life was getting more and more uncomfortable and I wasn’t happy about being home alone all day. The cats were no longer allowed out and my trips outside with Mocha were limited until Greg got home from work. In the midst of all of this we lost electric one day. The neighbors didn’t have any either so I called to report it. They said they never received our payment so they shut it off. I told them I’d give them payment over the phone but they needed to turn it back on because we had no water. Try to explain to an electric company employee from the city what a well was and how a well pump worked. I also told them they shut our neighbor’s electric off too. Within a few hours someone from the electric company was knocking at the door. We’d have electric back! They came to investigate why the neighbors had no electric and why none of us had water.  It turned out there was one meter for both houses. The boys had no idea because their electric was included in their rent. Greg and I had been paying for both sides of the house since we moved in. The electric company gave us a refund of everything we paid them since we’d been there and  sent the owner a bill. The bill would stay in his name until he installed a separate meter. To add insult to injury, he got a hefty fine for not having separate electric for each unit.

This s**t really hit the fan after that. Fortunately we bought a house, gave our written notice and just had to wait for settlement and moving day. It couldn’t come soon enough! Koko and Wrangler moved to a boarding barn. Mocha, Furball and Jasmine, Greg and I moved to our new house.

 

Daisy – Free At Last

The recovery collar is gone, the confinement is over and the hell raising has begun! Last night Daisy’s vet gave the ok for her to resume to normal activity. I’m not sure he realized what “normal activities” for Daisy are. No sooner did the collar came off, the zoomies came on. Four laps around the house, bouncing off the furniture and chasing cats didn’t take the edge off.

Almost 2 weeks after the collar came off Daisy is finally starting to settle at times. She’s still bouncing off furniture, chasing cats and trying to rob us blind, but at least there is some quiet time.

A month and a half after surgery it looks like settling any more isn’t going to happen. We’re grateful for what we got (which isn’t much). Daisy still runs around like a loon, chases cats and steals things she shouldn’t to get someone to chase her. Oh well … she’s a 10 month old Beagle puppy.

IMG_0849

Daisy – Growing Up and Settling Down

But it’s certainly not by choice! At 9 months it was time to be spayed. We dropped her off at the vet the night before. The house was so quiet I almost couldn’t stand it. I worried the following day until I heard surgery went well and Daisy was doing great. She could be picked up that night. She was still a bit dopey when we got there, but so happy to see us. We were sent home with a list of instructions, including keep her quiet for 2 weeks. I guess “If you want her quiet, you keep her” was the wrong response. She couldn’t walk a straight line from the truck tshe o the house, but hoping up one the sofa immediately wasn’t a problem.

Day 4 – Monday, rainy and the first day I had to deal with Daisy on my own. Unsettled and mad about being confined, this was a day of temper tantrums, fussing and seeing what she could get into in the two rooms she had to roam.  She was disgusted by being forced to sleep on the floor or in her bed and not spending all day on the sofa. She did t want to be on a leash anymore and pitched fits when she couldn’t try to rub her donut off in the fence. Somehow the little bugger figured out how to get rid of that donut. Collar still around her neck and Velcro still intact, but the donut was hanging off the side of her neck. It was like wrestling a wild calf trying to get it back on. Ugh … now she couldn’t be trusted to keep it on and I was a prisoner since I couldn’t take my eyes off of her. A trip to the vet and miss smarty pants was fitted with an e-collar and surgery site was checked.

Day 7 – Destructo pup has successfully demolished 3 recovery collars. Daisy has lost her patients over this situation and wants to play.  She wants to stay outside longer and not be on a leash anymore.

Days 8 & 9 – Another recovery collar (we’re up to 4 now), a ballistic pup and 3 cats that like to tease her. It’s going to be a really long 5 days!

IMG_0803

Daisy – Puppy’s First Christmas

It was a week before Christmas. I had all the presents and they were wrapped, food was here, I was ready…. except for the tree. At 6 months Daisy was a complete terror. She was into everything she could possibly think of and she was very creative. Greg and I decided it was probably not a good idea to get a tree. Daisy’s track record for destruction lead us to believe a tree wasn’t going to survive very long. The antique ceramic tree was going to be our Christmas tree.

For the first time in my life there wasn’t going to be a Christmas tree.  I was depressed. It may sound silly, but having a tree was probably one of the things I look forward to the most. We get a smaller tree. It only gets lights and an angel on top (we have the worst cats in the county) and it makes my allergies go haywire, but it just wasn’t Christmas without it. We pass the place we always get our trees on the way home from the barn. I looked over and saw the cutest tree. Greg told me to go back to look for a tree. Home we went with our 3 1/2′ tree. Let the games begin!

IMG_0421

On Christmas morning we took our coffee and tea into the living room. I took Daisy’s stocking down and sat on the floor. She was so excited!  She took turns playing with her toys and taking naps all day. She got to visit with (maul) my Mom in the afternoon. Daisy was exhausted by bedtime. She has a great first Christmas!

The tree? Most of it survived. It had bottom branches missing, more pine needles down than usual and in more places throughout the house. It remained standing and the lights stayed on. It came down on New Year’s Day because I was really tired of taking tree pieces out of the puppy’s mouth.

 

 

Daisy – Puppy Lessons, Socialization & Exhaustion

Daisy’s lessons started right away with housebreaking being first. She also started learning come, sit, stay … all of the standard puppy things. She’s smart caught on quickly.

Since she could only be in her crate for a limited time, we took advantage of it and got her used to the truck. I put a “go bag” together for her and she went everywhere we could take her. Daisy loved going to the barn. She was fascinated by the horses, loved playing with the goats and there was people that made a huge fuss over her. My husband and I would take turns riding/puppy sitting. We sat on the grass next to the ring and goat pen so she had plenty to look at. We did this every weekend until she started to get car sick.

IMG_0062

 

I work at home so every day I’d eat my lunch and we’d go out in the yard to play. It didn’t take her long to catch on. I’d put the food away and she’d demand to go outside immediately. After I was finished work, we’d go out and play for a half hour. It didn’t take long for (my) exhaustion to start setting in. Keeping Daismaniac out of everything was a full time job! The bigger she got, the more she was able to get into.

Fall turned into winter and we weren’t able to spend as much time outside so Daisy quickly learned how to terrorize inside. I was beginning to think our exhaustion was permanent and I knew winter was not going to be fun.